Discover World heritage

Visit Arles, roads to Saint Jacques de Compostela, Cloister of Saint Trophimus, Episcopal City ..


The route of Santiago de Compostela

Pilgrim passport :
Issued by pilgrimage associations, this can be stamped at the entrance of St Trophime Monastery, the Alyscamps and the Tourist Office. 

Useful informations :

Download the pilgrimage routes through Arles (.pdf)

Pilgrim housing :
Download the list of the partners (.pdf)

Useful links 
The pilgrim's route through Arles

The episcopal city

From the 4th century the Christian community in Arles began to build a first cathedral close to the city walls. Moved closer to the Forum in the 5th century, it was given the name of St Etienne becoming the French Episcopal cathedral for some time. In the 12th century the church of St Trophime and its buildings were built next to the cloisters. Nearby, various other churches and convents grew up, of which the most famous is that of St Césaire.

Abbey of Montmajour

Located at the gates of Arles on the road to Fontvieille, the Abbey  is made up of two convents built between the 11th and 18th centuries, and are evidence of eight centuries of monastic life in Rhodanian Provence.

Founded in 949 on an island surrounded by marshland, it initially housed a Benedictine community. The monastery gradually grew and became wealthier,  quickly becoming one of the most popular pilgrimage sites in Europe, in particular at the time of the Great Absolution of the Holy-Cross, instituted in 1030. Many of the buildings on the site, convent buildings, cloisters, chapels, towers, etc. are of great architectural interest.
In 1791, the building was sold and transformed into a stone quarry. The buildings, partly destroyed, were saved by the city of Arles, that repurchased them in 1838. Listed as a historic building in 1840, the buildings were restored by Henri Révoil under the Second Empire. In 1945, the abbey became property of the state.